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Gabriel needed an appropriate placement and special education services for kindergarten.

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06.29.2015 | AFC has a new fact sheet explaining the available appeal options for students whose Regents exam scores are keeping them from graduating from high school. Typically, students must pass five Regents exams, with scores of 65 or higher, in order to graduate. However, in certain cases, students can appeal their lower Regents exam scores and still graduate. View the fact sheet

06.09.2015 | Today AFC testified before the City Council Committee on Finance to request that the final budget include increased funding for Committee on Special Education staff and increased funding for progressive discipline support. View testimony

05.20.2015 | Advocates for Children of New York (AFC) and Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP (DPW) announced today a settlement with the New York City Department of Education (DOE) of a long-standing class action lawsuit on behalf of students with disabilities who are subject to disciplinary action while in New York City public schools. The lawsuit, originally filed in federal court in Brooklyn in 2002 and entitled E.B. v. New York City Department of Education, alleged that the DOE routinely denied students with disabilities required legal protections when they were suspended, excluded from class or school, or discharged involuntarily from school. The class action includes students with disabilities in New York City public schools from kindergarten through age 21. The Court set July 23, 2015 as the hearing date for final approval of the settlement.

Read the long form of the settlement notice to class members, the short form of the notice, the stipulation of settlement, and the full press release.

The settlement notice is also available in Arabic, Bengali, Chinese, French, Haitian Creole, Korean, Russian, Spanish, and Urdu. 

William JesinkeyWilliam (Bill) Jesinkey, the founding Executive Director of Advocates for Children and a leader in special education in New York City, died on December 25, 2014, at the age of 80. Bill was a brilliant and imaginative thinker and practical doer, who throughout his career was able to bring people and groups together and use untapped resources to create outstanding educational programs and services for the City’s neediest students.

Bill grew up in South Brooklyn, graduated from Manhattan College, and received a Masters degree from Teachers College, Columbia University. In 1960, he became a teacher in the City’s public school system, working in the “600 schools,” which at the time warehoused students—almost entirely Black and Latino boys—who were thrown out of other schools because of behavior problems. Bill found that most of the kids he worked with had emotional and other disabilities that interfered with their learning, but despite state and federal laws mandating and funding services for students with disabilities, they were not even considered for appropriate educational services.

In the early 1970s, based on his unique experience and knowledge, and using his leadership and organizing skills, Bill undertook a campaign to challenge what he saw as the denial of students’ educational rights. He brought together concerned groups and individuals to pool resources and obtain foundation and public funding to create the organization that became Advocates for Children. The mission of the organization—which guides AFC to this day—was to provide educational advocacy for individual kids and families and, based on issues emerging from its cases, work for systemic public education reform through research, organizing, administrative negotiation, and impact litigation. Bill’s influential “Lost Children” report, documenting the school system’s failure to provide appropriate educational services to the most disadvantaged students, was AFC’s first publication.

In parallel effort, Bill formed a partnership with a group of Christian Brothers in Queens who were working in parochial schools and were frustrated by their inability to help the young people in their community. Together they established the Martin de Porres School, an exemplary special education school for children and youth with emotional disabilities. The school remains in existence today, along with a related, independent program, the Martin de Porres Group Homes, which serves students who need residential care.

Bill was committed to public education, and once AFC and Martin de Porres were firmly established, he returned to the school system, working as a special educator. In 1983, he was appointed by the Chancellor of the City’s public schools as Superintendent of the Division of Special Education. As Superintendent, Bill worked tirelessly to create and provide quality educational programs and services to students with severe disabilities and to persuade principals across the system to consider these kids as their children.

After he retired from the school system, Bill continued to apply his leadership and knowledge to special and public education projects. He maintained his relationship with AFC throughout his life, and his selfless, passionate efforts resulted in quality educational services for thousands of students. He was an inspirational mentor who leaves a wonderful legacy in the countless teachers and advocates he influenced. Bill’s obituary card aptly quoted the statement of Francis of Assisi, “Start by doing what’s necessary; then do what’s possible, and suddenly you are doing the impossible.”

By Jane Stern, former Executive Director of AFC, and Richard Sexton, former AFC Board Member.

04.24.2015 | The ARISE Coalition (which is coordinated by Advocates for Children), is launching a campaign to improve literacy instruction for students with disabilities. See our Call to Action (also available in Spanish and Chinese) for more details, and visit the Coalition's Change.org page to send a letter to Chancellor Fariña (click here for a copy of the letter to the Chancellor in Spanish). On the evening of May 18, ARISE will be sponsoring a panel and parent speak out on literacy instruction for students with disabilities. Download a larger version of the flyer in English and Spanish.

event flyer

04.22.2015 | Families with children born in 2011 may apply to Pre-K by Friday, April 24th. To apply to full-day Pre-K for All programs at public schools and New York City Early Education Centers (community-based organizations), you should use the Department of Education’s centralized application form. You can list up to 12 Pre-K for All programs on your application and should list programs in order of your true preference. There are three ways to apply: 

  1. Apply online at www.nyc.gov/prek until midnight on 4/24; or 
  2. Visit a Family Welcome Center in person, Monday through Friday between 8 a.m. and 3 p.m., until 3 p.m. on 4/24; or 
  3. Call (718) 935-2067, Monday through Friday between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m., until 6 p.m. on 4/24. 

The application is available online in ten languages: Arabic, Bengali, Chinese, English, French, Haitian Creole, Korean, Russian, Spanish, and Urdu. The DOE will also provide interpreters in more than 200 languages to help families who apply in person at a Family Welcome Center or over the phone.

You can use the Pre-K Finder on your computer or mobile device to help you find nearby Pre-K programs. If you would like assistance in finding Pre-K programs, you can also complete the form on the Pre-K Finder (“I would like a call about Pre-K”) to receive a call from the DOE.

To learn about the Pre-K options and admissions priorities, you should review the Pre-K Directory. Directories are available in ten languages.

Dual Language Learners
All families with children born in 2011 may apply to Pre-K programs. The DOE directory updates state which public schools offer Dual Language Pre-K for All programs. If you wish to apply to a Dual Language program, you must list the specific Dual Language program on your application. The DOE directory updates also indicate which NYC Early Education Centers offer Enhanced Language Instruction (ELI) programming in a language other than English. An ELI program may offer books in the target language and a staff member who speaks the target language.

Students with Disabilities
All families with children born in 2011 may apply to Pre-K programs. Preschool students with Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) that recommend Special Education Itinerant Teacher (SEIT) services or related services only can receive these recommended services at the Pre-K program site. Preschool students whose IEPs recommend a half-day special class or half-day special class in an integrated setting may participate in a Pre-K class for the rest of the day. For more information about preschool special education services, see AFC’s Guide to Preschool Special Education in English or Spanish.

04.14.2015 | Today AFC is testifying before the New York City Council Committee on Public Safety, the Committee on Education, and the Sub-Committee on Non-Public Schools regarding school climate and discipline. AFC supports the passage of both Introduction Number 730, amending the Student Safety Act, and Introduction Number 719, requiring the DOE to report on the ratio of School Safety Officers (“SSOs”) to Guidance Counselors in each school. View testimony

03.30.2015 | Today, AFC submitted testimony to the City Council Education Committee on resolutions regarding school funding, the charter school cap, and parents’ ability to opt out of standardized tests. View testimony

03.25.2015 | Today, AFC is testifying before the City Council Education Committee about the education proposals in the Fiscal Year 2016 Preliminary Budget. We are heartened that the Preliminary Budget includes increased funding for a literacy initiative to support students with disabilities, interpretation services for immigrant families, behavioral supports, and Pre-K. However, more funding is needed to have a significant impact. View AFC's testimony 

The ARISE Coalition, which is coordinated by AFC, is also testifying at today's hearing, urging the Council to fund the proposed literacy initiative as a down payment on what we hope will be a longer-term commitment to ensuring that every student in NYC learns to read proficiently. View the ARISE Coalition's testimony 

03.09.2015 | On March 24, AFC's Junior Board and NYU Law School's Education Law and Policy Society will hold a panel discussing the experiences of undocumented young people, particularly those who arrived recently, as they enter the City and try to access their right to a public education. RSVP by March 17

invitation