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Micaela is a dual-language learner who is on the autism spectrum and needed an appropriate school placement for kindergarten.

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News & Media

AFC in the News

11.08.2021 | NY Daily News | “With the right support, schools can transform the lives of students who are homeless,” said Advocates for Children Executive Director Kim Sweet. “The next administration should bring together city agencies and charge them with ensuring every student who is homeless gets the support needed to succeed in school.” Read article

11.08.2021 | NY1 | “There’s still alarmingly, shockingly high, over 100,000 students identified as homeless for the sixth year in a row," said Jennifer Pringle, director of the Learners in Temporary Housing project at Advocates for Children, which compiled the data. "And while there is a decline as compared to last year, at this point, it’s really unclear how real that decline is." 

Of those children, about 28,000 spent time living in city homeless shelters, according to the data released by the organization Advocates for Children. Another 65,000 were “doubled-up," or sharing someone else’s housing after losing their own permanent residence. 

“These are oftentimes very overcrowded, substandard living situations... not optimal places for learning,” Pringle said. That can mean a student has no private or quiet place study, or no access to the internet. Read article

11.08.2021 | Bronx News 12 | “Youths who don't get their high school diplomas are four-and-a-half times more likely to experience homelessness, so if we really want to break the cycle of homelessness, education absolutely needs to be a part of that conversation,” says Jennifer Pringle, the project director of Advocates for Children. 

For the sixth consecutive year, the Advocates for Children of New York say over 100,000 students in New York City public and charter schools identified as homeless during the 2020-21 school year. 

The organization also says around 65,000 students stay with friends or family in overcrowded housing while another 28,000 live in shelters. Watch video

11.08.2021 | Fox 5 New York | More than 100,000 New York City schoolchildren were homeless at some point during the 2020-2021 school year, a 42% increase since 2010, according to a report released Monday by the group Advocates for Children of New York. 

"These numbers are really troubling, really alarming," AFC's Jennifer Pringle said. "Roughly 28,000 were living in shelters, 65,000 were in temporary doubled-up or shared housing situations and approximately 3,860 students were living in cars, parks, abandoned buildings, and other substandard housing situations." Watch video

11.08.2021 | amNY | “No child should be homeless, but while Mayor-elect Adams’ administration makes plans to tackle New York City’s housing and homelessness crisis, they must meet the immediate, daily educational needs of students who are homeless,” said Kim Sweet, Executive Director of Advocates for Children. 

AFC’s number represents a slight drop from the reported number of students who experienced homelessness during the 2019-20 school year by 9% but that decrease could also be the result of fewer children enrolling in the public school system. Since the pandemic started, New York City public schools have lost over 50,000 students, DOE data shows.  Read article

11.08.2021 | CBS 2 New York |  A new report finds for the sixth year in a row more than 100,000 students in New York City’s public schools experienced homelessness. 

Now, a coalition of advocacy organizations are calling on Mayor-elect Eric Adams to take more aggressive steps to address the problem, CBS2’s Aundrea Cline-Thomas reported Monday. 

“Educational supports for students need to be overhauled,” said Jennifer Pringle, project director for Advocates for Children. Watch video

11.08.2021 | Inside City Hall | Mayor Bill de Blasio joins political anchor Errol Louis for his weekly "Mondays with the Mayor" interview. Among the topics they discussed: The possibility New York City public schools will need to expand COVID-19 vaccine availability where there is big demand; Data showing, despite a decline, more than 101,000 New York City students were homeless at some point during the last school year. Watch video

11.09.2021 | NBC New York | Advocates for Children and a coalition of other social service groups are calling on Mayor-elect Eric Adams to address the problem of student homelessness through measures such as hiring shelter-based staff members to help families navigate the city's complicated education bureaucracy. 

“No child should be homeless, but while Mayor-elect Adams’ administration makes plans to tackle New York City’s housing and homelessness crisis, they must meet the immediate, daily educational needs of students who are homeless,” Advocates for Children executive director Kim Sweet said. Watch video

11.02.2021 | amNY | “The Department of Education needs to make it clear what the DESSA screening tool is and what the purpose of it is to make it clear to families, school staff and students and what it can do and what it’s not meant to do,” said Dawn Yuster, director of the School Justice Project at Advocates for Children. 

DOE officials claim screens will only take instructors a few minutes to complete, but some teachers are skeptical that they will be able to fill out an online form they are unfamiliar with so quickly especially with questions that some have called “ridiculously subjective.” Read article

11.01.2021 | NY Daily News | The lack of access to the internet in shelters created further barriers when I was living in family shelters with my son. Like so many homeless students in New York City who could not properly access virtual schooling throughout the pandemic, my son spent years unable to research and complete homework assignments due to his lack of internet access. A report by Advocates for Children of New York found that attendance rates for students living in shelters ranged between 75%-80% from January to June of 2020 — much lower than rates for students in permanent housing. Read article