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Micaela is a dual-language learner who is on the autism spectrum and needed an appropriate school placement for kindergarten.

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11.1.2011 | New York Post | “It’s troubling, because a lot of these kids are being suspended for behaviors that could be dealt with in a more constructive fashion,” said Kim Sweet, executive director of Advocates for Children. “We think suspension is very much a last resort because it removes a child from the classroom and it doesn’t teach them appropriate behavior.”... Read article

10.18.2011 | Gotham Schools | Advocates for Children of New York testified before the New York City Council regarding the education of homeless children and youth. “Unfortunately, specific practices at DOE and DHS all but guarantee educational instability for a large swath of homeless students,” testified Jared Stein of Advocates for Children of New York.... Read article

10.18.2011 | New York 1 News | "Without busing, parents of elementary school students must rely on DOE-provided MetroCards to accompany their child or children twice a day, every school day. For too many families, a MetroCard offers no solution," said Jared Stein of Advocates for Children.... Read article

10.17.2011 | Gotham Schools | Advocates for Children of New York will be serving on a statewide think tank that will advise the State Education Department on its application for a No Child Left Behind waiver.... Read article

10.12.2011 | New York 1 News | Advocates said it is about time. "It's a great first step if it's put in place properly," said Gisela Alvarez of Advocates for Families and Children. "There is no doubt that these things need to be done."... Read article

10.23.2019 | The 74 | The number of school-age foster youth in the city varies by source; Advocates for Children of New York reported 4,500 students in a “snapshot” count in May, whereas the district recorded about 7,800 during the 2017-18 year. In most cases, foster youth are children who’ve been removed from their parents or guardians by a child welfare agency and placed into alternative care, which can range from living with a relative to staying in an emergency shelter.

The scarcity of foster-youth-specific data thus far isn’t lost on education equity groups like Advocates for Children of New York.

“It’s easy to overlook students in foster care because their numbers are relatively small, but given the many challenges they face, they require a greater level of attention and targeted support from school districts,” staff attorney Chantal Hinds said in a statement.  Read article

11.1.19 | Chalkbeat | Some advocates cheered the continued decline in suspensions, and added that more  social support is needed.

“Going forward, it is critical that the city build on these promising results by creating a solid infrastructure to institutionalize them and make the necessary additional investments in mental health services and supports, social workers, and restoratives practices to further expand on them,” said Dawn Yuster, director of the School Justice Project at Advocates for Children. Read article

10.28.19 | Patch | The "stubbornly high" total reflects a more than 70 percent increase in student homelessness over the last decade even though the school system's homeless population shrank by about 600 kids compared to the prior year, says Advocates for Children of New York, the nonprofit that runs the center.

"This problem is immense," Kim Sweet, Advocates for Children's executive director, said in a statement. "... The city won't be able to break the cycle of homelessness until we address the dismal educational outcomes for students who are homeless." Read article

12.15.19 | Raw Story | When Bloomberg took office in 2002, there were over 5,000 homeless families. By the fall of 2013, a few months before he left office, there were close to 12,500 families living in shelters.

Today, there are 34,000 children like Shamari living in city shelters. According to Advocates for Children, a non-profit advocacy group, there are another 74,000 school age children “doubling up” in temporary circumstances. In 2017, 1,164 newborns were brought “home” to a city shelter.

For four years in a row, New York City’s homeless student population has surpassed 100,000, ten percent of the total student population. (A Yankee Stadium standing room only crowd is 52,000.)

Being homeless is traumatic for anyone, but for children the impacts are long-term and formative. Two-thirds of the homeless students “are chronically absent from class” and only 57 percent graduate from high school, according to Advocates for Children. Read article