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Micaela’s Story

Micaela is a dual-language learner who is on the autism spectrum and needed an appropriate school placement for kindergarten.

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AFC in the News

11.05.2018 | NY1 | Thirty of the city's top foster care agencies and advocacy groups have sent a letter to Mayor Bill de Blasio, asking him to provide school bus service to foster children in kindergarten through sixth grade. Right now, the city simply gets those kids to school by giving them MetroCards or paying for car service, leaving it to the foster family to accompany the child on their own time, and their own dime...With the city education department overhauling its troubled school bus system, the foster care advocates felt now was the time to act. “We thought this was really a crucial moment for the Department of Education and the Mayor to realize that there’s this other group of students who also needs assistance with transportation,” Erika Palmer of Advocates for Children of NY said. “It’s crucial for their educational stability.” Read article

11.02.2018 | Chalkbeat New York | But nearly 40,000 special education students — or 22 percent of all students classified as having disabilities — received only part of the interventions they were entitled to or did not receive any extra support whatsoever. Kim Sweet, executive director of Advocates for Children, a non-profit that works on behalf of students with disabilities, wrote that “while the data show incremental improvements” — the fact that many students are left without services is alarming. “Given the 40-point gap in reading proficiency between students with disabilities and their nondisabled peers, it is essential that the DOE ensure students with disabilities receive the instruction they need,” Sweet said. Read article

11.01.2018 | Chalkbeat New York | Heeding calls from advocates, schools Chancellor Richard Carranza proposed Thursday a $750 million plan to improve accessibility for students with disabilities at a third of the schools in every district. The announcement comes after months of urging from advocates over the lack of access for students with disabilities in a majority of school buildings. About 80 percent of New York City’s public schools are not completely accessible. Last budget cycle, the city committed $150 million to improve access over the next three years. But in order to make just a third of school buildings accessible, advocates estimated a cost of another $750 million. Officials said that, under the new plan, they expect half of elementary school buildings will be partially or fully accessible. Advocates for children with disabilities applauded the news. The plan will “literally open the doors to inclusion,” said Kim Sweet, executive director for Advocates of Children New York, in a statement. Read article

11.01.2018 | Wall Street Journal | Maggie Moroff, special-education policy coordinator at Advocates for Children, applauded the plan’s goal of making a third of schools in every community district accessible to students with disabilities over the next five years. According to the group, less than 20% of the city’s public schools currently are fully accessible. Read article

11.01.2018 | New York Daily News | Carranza’s capital plan sets a road map for the physical aspects of the city’s 1,800 public schools over the next five years. It includes $750 million to make one-third of the city’s schools in each district fully accessible to city students with disabilities by 2024, something that activists, including Advocates for Children, had pushed for. The issue grabbed headlines in October when an Advocates for Children report showed just 1 in 6 city schools are fully accessible. Read article

11.01.2018 | WNYC | Increased funding for accessibility is a step toward affording students with physical disabilities the same opportunities as their able-bodied peers, advocates say. "In a city that prides itself on giving students choice, the choices for kids with physical disabilities are much more limited that can't get into every building and if they can get in, they can't get around,” said Maggie Moroff, the Special Education Policy Coordinator at Advocates for Children. Read article

10.28.2018 | Patch.com |  School staff sometimes fail to nip bullying in the bud, minimizing small incidents that grow into more harmful patterns of behavior, said Dawn Yuster of Advocates for Children of New York, an education advocacy group. And even though kids may be suspended or otherwise punished, the schools sometimes don't do enough to address the problem, Yuster said. "A lot of times principals and schools don't really know what to do to stop it," said Yuster, the director of AFC's School Justice Project. "… They will try different things but they're not effective and they don't really know the best strategies to use to address it." Read article

10.17.2018 | New York Daily News | Advocates for Children Special Education Policy Coordinator Maggie Moroff said the practice of forcing kids to use secondary entrances is “exactly the kind of thing that makes students with disabilities and their families feel like second-class citizens.” She added: “Overall, it’s another way the students with disabilities get segregated from their more typical peers.” Read article

10.15.2018 | New York Times | Tonight, about one out of every 10 students in New York City will sleep in a homeless shelter or in the homes of relatives. That’s more children than at any other time since city records have been kept. In the morning, those same children will fan out across the city to go to school, some crossing multiple boroughs to get there. Last year, the number of city students in temporary housing topped 100,000 children for the third consecutive year, according to state data released Monday by Advocates for Children of New York, a group that provides legal and advocacy services for needy students. Read article

10.15.2018 | Politico New York | More than 114,000 New York City students were identified as homeless during the 2017-18 school year, according to new state Education Department data posted by Advocates for Children of New York. "The number of students who are homeless in New York City would fill Yankee Stadium twice," said Kim Sweet, AFC's executive director, in a statement. "While the City works to address the overwhelming problem of homelessness, it must take bold action to ensure that students who are homeless get an excellent education and do not get stuck in a cycle of poverty." Read article