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AFC in the News

09.20.2017 | Chalkbeat New York | Advocates have repeatedly pointed out problems with the city’s special education system, including lack of access to key services. But some say Rello-Anselmi tends to be open to criticism, and is receptive to proposed fixes. “She has acknowledged the problems,” said Maggie Moroff, a special-education expert at Advocates for Children. “She’s not closing her eyes and wishing they would go away.” Read article

09.14.2017 | Democrat & Chronicle | If political capital is lacking for funding increases, it is likely due to a series of highly publicized fraud cases in New York City several years ago... "When the (troubling) reports came out about providers stealing funding, we said, 'You need to punish the bad actors, not the preschoolers,'" said Randi Levine of Advocates for Children of New York. "I think that negative media attention has made it more challenging for the state to approve a higher reimbursement rate, even though the vast majority of providers are doing wonderful work every day to serve children with disabilities." Read article

09.04.2017 | New York Daily News | The city is illegally denying necessary services to thousands of students with disabilities — and the poorest kids get cheated the most often, according to advocates and data the Daily News obtained. As of May, 8,854 public school students with disabilities were lacking services such as speech therapy, physical therapy and counseling, according to figures the city Education Department supplied... Maggie Moroff, special education policy coordinator for Advocates for Children of New York, said suffering often awaits students like Cameron who miss out on mandated services. “This is a big deal,” Moroff said. “If a kid isn’t getting those services, then they’re having trouble. They’re not going to be able to participate in things like reading and writing.” Read article

08.22.2017 | Chalkbeat New York | English and math exam pass rates inched up in New York City this year compared to last year — more than they did in the state as a whole, city officials announced Tuesday. The annual release of test scores created a wave of reactions from education stakeholders across the state. Read article

07.26.2017 | Guernica | In 1975, Congress enacted what is now called the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), a law granting all children the right to a “free appropriate public education” in the “least restrictive environment.” The statute’s implications are profound: students with a range of disabilities are entitled to specially designed services, and, as much as possible, they must be educated in mainstream classrooms. About 6.5 million children across the US now receive special-education services. Under the IDEA, parents, school staff, and other professionals work together to craft an Individualized Education Program (IEP) for each eligible student. An IEP defines a student’s learning needs and the supports the school will minister, providing parents a legal basis to advocate for their children. If a dispute arises, parents may seek mediation or request a due-process hearing. However, for many low-income and minority families, these protections remain abstractions... For forty years, Advocates for Children of New York (AFC) has worked to realize the ideals of the IDEA by representing low-income families in school-related proceedings. Read article

07.24.2017 | Chalkbeat New York | Career and technical education has been shown to help students make it to graduation. But New York City’s English language learners — who consistently lag behind their peers when it comes to on-time graduation — are both under-enrolled in the city’s CTE programs and less likely to complete them, according to a new report. Released Monday by the nonprofit Advocates for Children of New York, the report shows that while English learners made up 10.8 percent of the city’s high school students in the 2015–16 school year, they comprised only 5.3 percent of students in CTE programs. Though the number of CTE schools in New York City has increased dramatically over the past decade, the report raises the question of whether all groups of students are benefiting equally from these programs. Read article

07.12.2017 | Chalkbeat New York | Maggie Moroff, a disability policy expert at Advocates for Children, said in an interview that the report’s findings did not surprise her and that related services are just as important as general academic instruction. “It’s all the other things that go into a student’s ability to process and learn and develop in school,” Moroff said. “Without any of them, you’re denying a student a really important piece of their education.” Read article

06.20.2017 | WNYC | Emma Albert, 14, has never entered her school through the front door. The eighth grader has a vascular malformation on her left leg, which means that since the first grade she used a wheelchair though she could switch to crutches for short distances. And it means that she could access only the areas of her school that were wheelchair accessible. So, each morning she entered The Manhattan School for Children through a side entrance. When it came time to apply to high school, she lamented that her search was driven more by accessibility than school offerings. "They don’t really care about, 'What are your interests outside of school?' It’s like, as long as it’s accessible, it’s a good school for you," she said. Emma and other students spoke at a recent panel on school accessibility, organized by the ARISE Coalition (coordinated by Advocates for Children) and Parents for Inclusive Education. Read article

06.14.2017 | Chalkbeat New York | For many students, navigating the middle and high school admissions process can be overwhelming because New York City’s choice system allows them to apply to dozens of schools. But for students with physical disabilities, it can be overwhelming for the opposite reason: Very few schools are completely accessible to them. A coalition of advocates hope to raise awareness about that gap by hosting a panel discussion and “speak-out” Thursday evening where middle and high school students with physical, vision, and hearing impairments will talk about their experiences making their way through the city’s admissions process. “A lot of these students end up with really, really limited school options,” said Maggie Moroff, a disability policy expert at Advocates for Children, and who is helping coordinate the event. Read article

05.09.2017 | Chalkbeat New York | Maggie Moroff, a disability policy expert at Advocates for Children, said the report validates the idea that problems with SESIS have persisted for years without being adequately addressed. But the bigger issue, she emphasized, is that many students with disabilities are going without services they need. “We can’t wait,” Moroff said. “They have to be fixing [SESIS] and fix the service deficiencies in the system at the same time.” Read article